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History

12/08/2017 - 10:18am

The huge boulder rolled deliberately in the middle of the road was the first sign of trouble. On May 11, 1889, along a dusty trail in Arizona, an unlikely bunch of desperadoes made off with $28,000 in gold from U.S. Army Paymaster Major Joseph Washington Wham. Buffalo Soldiers from the 24th Infantry were part of the 12-man escort that would go down fighting that day.

With a cry of "Look out, you black sons of bitches!" a buckskin-clad bandit opened fire on the wagon train from his advantageous position on the heights. The soldiers grabbed their guns, stored in the second wagon. Some were able to take cover, but others, such as Sergeant Benjamin Brown, were struck quickly by the hail of bullets coming from the other bandits, estimated to be between 12 and 15 in number. This didn't mean the soldiers stopped resisting the onslaught.

11/29/2017 - 11:34am
If you like Red Sparrow by Jason Matthews

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

11/09/2017 - 10:36am

"That two battalions of Marines be raised consisting of one colonel, two lieutenant colonels, two majors and officers as usual in other regiments, that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken that no person be appointed to office or enlisted into said battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea." (Resolution of the Continental Congress, 10 November 1775.)

November 10 marks the birthday of the United States Marine Corps. On this day in 1775, the Continental Congress passed a resolution calling for the creation of two battalions of Marines to serve the new nation. Each year in Marine posts throughout the world, traditions such as the birthday ball and the cutting of birthday cake continue, bonding generations of warriors together as they celebrate their shared brotherhood.

11/08/2017 - 11:06am

Gumdrops, lollipops, chocolate squares, jelly bears, and peppermint candies. The sky is the limit as far as decorating your own gingerbread house. They are a ton of fun to decorate, but first, you need to make the house itself.

09/11/2017 - 11:55am

Columbus Day is sometimes called Discoverers' Day. In the spirit of discovery, take some time to learn about the world as it was in the days of the European explorers. You can make a compass, learn about the stars, read about other explorers and discoverers, and find how even our way of eating has changed since the Europeans came to the Americas looking for gold, glory, and, yes, tasty cooking spices.

10/05/2017 - 9:20am

In 1800, the land held by the new United States was small compared to what was called Louisiana. Louisiana was named for King Louis XIV of France. It was part of a large claimed area in the New World called New France. It stretched from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Appalachian Mountains to the Rocky Mountains.

06/22/2017 - 12:11pm

Provensen and Provensen. Alice and Martin. Martin and Alice. Two illustrators and writers working so closely together that their styles were indistinguishable. It was the same style really, gentle drawings so delightful in their clarity that they subtly underscored the text of the dozens of children's books that they illustrated.

06/14/2017 - 8:22am
Accessing the Old Newspapers of Fredericksburg

There have been newspapers published in Fredericksburg since 1788. (The only gap came in 1862-65, when the city was devastated by war.)  Fredericksburg has been a one-newspaper town – the Free Lance-Star –- since the 1920s, but before that many newspapers were published locally….

 

10/02/2017 - 1:53pm
The Card Catalog: Books, Cards and Literary Treasures

For the better part of the 20th century, the card catalog stood as a gateway to the wonders of the library. In The Card Catalog: Books, Cards and Literary Treasures, the Library of Congress celebrates the importance of the card catalog throughout library history.

The card catalog is seen as one of the most versatile and durable organizational scheme developed throughout history. It is the map to go to if you want to navigate your way through the vast wilderness of books. Although the beginnings of the card catalog started off slowly, it now covers every subject, from ancient to modern history, in libraries around the world. Peter Devereaux, writer-editor for the Library of Congress, notes that the catalog is a "tangible example of humanity's effort to establish and preserve the possibility of order."

05/03/2017 - 2:28am
Get Well Soon: History's Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them

Author Jennifer Wright studies plagues. Often individuals ask if she studies "modern" plagues, such as using your cell phone too much. But in her new book Get Well Soon: History's Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them, she reveals that her interest lies within the history of plagues where you break out in sores and turn feverish. The kind of plagues that kill you.

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